Saturday, November 29, 2008

Bay Area Whine

Dawn Aguiar, House Debtor/Deadbeat
Roy Risk, House Debtor ('Risk')
Mark Gagliardi, House Debtor
Sue Chai, House Debtor
Rachelle Gonzales, House Debtor
Karen Mims, House Debtor

They should have looked for the good deals before signing up to a crippling mortgage they could not afford. It wasn't too difficult to understand that they were overpaying in the midst of an epic bubble, unless, of course, they actually believed the realtard line that "real estate only goes up", or better yet, "you'll be priced out forever." BWAHAHAHA

What they fail to grasp, which isn't suprising since they overpaid in the first place, is that the "deals" they are seeking will not be deals in 1-3 years. We are still facing a catastrophic economic collapse. These houses will fall another 30-50% from today's prices.

Dawn, this video is for you:
THE HOUSING BUBBLE EXPLAINED ** SPECIAL SHEEP VIDEO!

2008-11-25: Homeowners say no help from lenders
Customers of Countrywide, Wachovia and other lenders describe the firms as uncooperative, ineffective and rude. Borrowers say they must navigate a maze of phone banks. They say lenders won't offer good deals.

"They're supposed to be getting people into fixed-rate loans they can afford, reducing their principal," Aguiar said. "That's not what I'm getting from Countrywide."
(Kiss my a**, Dawn)

"One lady I spoke to was rude, she had a real attitude," Aguiar said. "She talked down to me like I was a deadbeat." (You're a deadbeat, Dawn)

Risk and his wife paid $921,000 in 2005 for a home, financing it with a $736,000 World Savings loan. Wachovia later inherited those loans. Their house is now worth $580,000, based on an appraisal in October.

Wachovia's offer? A first mortgage of about $580,000, at a fixed rate of 5.4 percent, with a 30-year loan term. So far, so good. But Wachovia also insisted on a second loan of $175,000 — to cover the difference between the current value of the house and the loan balance of around $755,000.

"What's going on here?" Risk said. "Are they going to help people or are they not?"
(Kiss my a**, Roy)

Mark Gagliardi has sought for months to rework his loan with Countrywide on his Oakley home, but to no avail. Gagliardi and his wife bought the house in 2006 for $768,500 and obtained two Countrywide loans totaling $691,000. Homes nearby now sell for $410,000 to $450,000.

"There is no way to refinance because there is no value left in the house," Gagliardi said. "We are hanging on by the skin of our teeth. We admit our part in this. But Congress did its job. The president did his job. Now the banks are dragging their feet."

Gagliardi wants a 30-year fixed-rate loan based on his home's current value. He has gotten nowhere with Countrywide, despite placing many calls to the firm.
(Kiss my a**, Mark)

Sue Chai Spaulding wants Bank of America to restructure a $250,000 equity line of credit on her Berkeley home. She got the loan to help buy a San Francisco house.

"They don't want to help you," Spaulding said. "But they shouldn't take this so lightly. These are people's lives. They have been rude to me." She has retained a lawyer.
(Kiss my a**, Sue)

Oakley resident Rachelle Gonzales started a loan workout process in May with American Home Mortgage. In September, the lender rejected the deal.

"It's so frustrating," Gonzales said. "They say they'll help. Then they say no. They have called me names. They have called me a slime. This has been awful. Just awful." Her loan is now delinquent.
(Rachelle, you're slime; kiss my a**)

Karen Mims sought for more than a year to convince her lender, Aurora Loan Services, to modify the $509,000 loan on her Oakland home. The payments are too high. "I have desperately tried to work things out," Mims said.

Mims was told she would be helped. But Aurora rejected a new loan although Mims was on a payment plan. On Nov. 12, Aurora foreclosed on the loan. She remains in her house of 11 years.

"This is my home," Mims said.
(Karen, it's not your house, anymore; kiss my a**)

"I'm ready to let (Wachovia) have the house," Risk said. "See if they can get $580,000 for it."

He says it's frustrating to see those he believes created the crisis receive help while he and his wife are ignored by lenders.

"They better be careful because those of us at the back of the line just might create the new foreclosure crisis," Risk said
======================

Roy, you and everybody else that participated in this bubble have destroyed the country through your lack of responsibility and self-entitlement attitudes. The meltdown is just getting warmed up. I was out of the stock market a year ago, and now I'm bracing for the next few steps in the process... currency devalution and raging inflation. Got gold?

5 comments:

Hobo said...

"They're supposed to be getting people into fixed-rate loans they can afford, reducing their principal," Aguiar said.

No, what was "supposed" to happen was Dawn Aguiar was supposed to pay her loan on time each and every month for the next 30 years (or whatever her terms were). Do any of these people understand that they signed a legally binding contract to pay x amount for x years before they own the house?

Tyrone said...

Here is the Aguiar mansion:

4343 Delaware Dr Fremont CA 94538
3 beds, 2.0 baths, 1,104 sq ft
Sale History
12/16/2005: $587,000
08/26/1998: $234,000

$587K for 1100 sq ft!!!
$533/sqft!!!

These are the idiots we're wasting tax dollars on.


Lets do the math:
assume 20% down
$470K mortgage loan

Historical affordability guidelines are 3x gross earnings for loan amount. Lets use 3.5x...

$470K/3.5 = $134K

The Aguiar household must earn $134K, right?

I don't believe this house is worth more than $300K. If houses in this neighborhood are still selling for $450K-$500K, my estimate of another 30-50% drop is good.

She gets her own post, tomorrow.

Tyrone said...

Here is Roy's pad...

460 TOWNSEND DR, Benicia, CA

Hobo said...

Everyone in this post deserves their own post...though Dawn does stand out in particular as a deadbeat.

From dictionary.com:
deadbeat [n. ded-beet; adj. ded-beet]
–noun
1. a person who deliberately avoids paying debts.

If it walks like a deadbeat and avoids paying debts like a deadbeat...

hahaha said...

Loved the {HOUSING BUBBLE EXPLAINED ** SPECIAL SHEEP VIDEO!} for Dawn that was fucking great!!!